How to Germinate a Peach Pit (Animated)

Peach-pit-germination

I decided to try something different on YouTube this week. Since my previous video on how to germinate a peach pit has been popular, I thought “hey, wouldn’t it be fun to animate the process with stop-motion?”

And so I did:

It’s really kind of a mess but this video will help me work some kinks out. I need to work on lighting, background and focus. The camera’s autofocus was not reliable and neither was the exposure, as you can see from frame to frame. I adjusted as best as I could in Final Cut after the fact but it’s not as good as getting sharp, well-lit shots at the beginning.

My YouTube viewers liked it, though, with the exception of one guy who wasn’t happy I didn’t animate all the way through to planting orchards and harvesting fruit:

Screen Shot 2018-03-15 at 7.53.25 AM

It’s always the potheads or the vegans…

If you are interested in seeing the results of growing peaches from seed, I’ve shared my successes both here and on YouTube:

I’d like to create more “Animated Gardener” videos. It’s fun to do and so long as I keep the videos short it doesn’t eat up too much time.

What do you think?

No, There Are No Blue Watermelons! Avoid Seed Hoaxers!

blue-watermelon-hoax-scam

A reader wrote me this last week sharing a site that sold blue watermelon seeds.

These watermelons are a long-time internet hoax, yet seed scammers are still taking advantage of gardeners and their love for interesting varieties.

On ebay right now are listings for blue watermelon seeds:

blue-watermelon-hoax

Note where these so-called “blue watermelon” seeds are coming from.

It ain’t the good old U.S. of A.

But you can bet that’s where the money is flowing from. Out of a gardener’s pocket and into the pocket of a scammer.

When you buy seeds from overseas, your chances of being scammed are much, much higher. How do you know that you’re going to get what you order?

You don’t.

And how will you take recourse if you plant the seeds and get something different than advertised? Or if they don’t come up at all?

You can’t.

Caveat emptor is the phrase of the eon when you’re dealing with overseas seeds. Of course, if you fall for something like this:

Screen Shot 2018-02-20 at 8.27.29 AM

Then maybe the scammers deserve your $1.39 + $0.28 shipping.

Here’s another batch of bizarre seeds, this time in the world of flowers:

fake-colorful-flowers

Seeds for a RAINBOW ROSE!

I need that!

OMGOMGOMG I NEED IT!

vomiting-rainbow-unicorn

Some of these seed offerings are believable, and some of them aren’t. You might have an ad for “heirloom tomatoes” which still isn’t heirloom tomatoes. Watch for those as well. If it looks too weird to be true, avoid it. And if it’s coming from China, avoid it.

The Chinese are well-known for scamming.

They have elaborate dating scams:

“A new study, “Quit Playing Games With My Heart: Understanding Online Dating Scams,” a collaboration between University College London and Jiayuan, China’s largest dating site, revealed the unbelievably creative and involved cons that plague online dating there.

The authors of the study analyzed more than 500,000 profiles, drawn from Jiayuan’s 100 million users, which the site’s employees had flagged as scam accounts. And while by far the most popular of these scams — fake profiles promoting escort services — will be familiar to anyone who uses Tinder in the U.S., the remaining scams could be drawn straight from The Sting or The Grifters.

The most ingenious of the Jiayuan scams starts when the owner of a fancy restaurant hires an attractive woman, who then makes a dating profile. The woman then contacts a lonely heart over Jiayuan and convinces him to take her on a date to the expensive restaurant, where she runs up an enormous tab. According to the study, these dates can cost anywhere from $100 to $2,000. Afterward, of course, the bilked bachelor never hears from his date again.”

And who could forget Chinese drywall?

Or deadly Chinese pet treats:

“When Kevin and Candace Thaxton’s 10-year-old pug Chansey got sick late last year, the couple assumed at first it was simply old age. The small dog started showing symptoms of kidney failure — drinking water excessively and urinating in the house. By the time the Thaxtons got her to a veterinarian, Chansey’s kidneys had shut down and she was in extreme pain. She died two days later.

“It was so hard. It was just devastating,” Kevin Thaxton told ABC News.

But the Thaxtons would go through the ordeal again just weeks later — leading them to a new theory behind Chansey’s death — when their new Pekingese-mix puppy Penny exhibited the same symptoms, finally resulting in kidney failure. When Candace Thaxton stumbled on a Food and Drug Administration warning that there’d been an increase in complaints about chicken jerky dog treats made in China, she says she knew immediately what had happened to her beloved dogs.

“I grabbed the bag of treats and turned it over,” Candace said. “At first I saw it said ‘Manufactured in South Carolina’ so I thought I was safe. Then I looked harder and it said ‘Made in China’ and I just said ‘Oh no.’ “

 

Of course, it’s not just China. There are hoaxes coming from other places. Nigeria has a reputation for fraud which is legendary. Instead of a few bucks for seeds, they’re stealing people’s entire retirements:

“Spears, who is a nursing administrator and CPR teacher, said she mortgaged the house and took a lien out on the family car, and ran through her husband’s retirement account.

“The retirement he was dreaming of — cruising and going around and seeing America — is pretty much gone for him right now,” she said.

She estimates it will take two years to clear the debt that accumulated in the more than two years she spent sending money to con artists.

Her family and bank officials told her it was all a scam, she said, and begged her to stop, but she persisted because she became obsessed with getting paid.”

Stupid!

This is why I’ve buried all my retirement money in mayonnaise jars where no one can find it.

Seriously though, if you see something like this:

indonesia-hoax-flower

NO.

JUST NO.

I understand the allure of blue watermelons and exotic seeds, but if it’s really out of the ordinary – and it’s coming from somewhere out of the ordinary – I can almost guarantee you’re going to get scammed. Fortunately, it’s not a huge loss – but every person who sends a couple of bucks to these thieves is just encouraging them.

If this sort of thing makes you mad, feel free to post this article on Facebook in various gardening groups. Also be sure to report nonsense on ebay when you see it.

I don’t like to see scammers making money or my readers losing it. Stick with good companies like Baker Creek for exotic seeds and just say NO to weirdos with weird-colored watermelons.

How to Grow Next Year’s Jack-O-Lanterns from the Remains of This Year’s

How-to-save-pumpkin-seeds-step-1

Are you are a crazy seed saver?

You know the type: you have avocado pits sprouting on the counter, watermelon seeds drying on paper towels, lemon seedlings sprouting on the bathroom windowsill…

Life is full of temptations for seed savers. Every fruit has a pit… Every nature hike has a must-have wildflower… Every trip to a botanical garden, you’re keeping your hands stuffed in your pockets so they don’t “accidentally” pinch a cutting.

But then, fall arrives… and you completely lose it.

Farm stands are loaded with amazing produce containing seeds!  Yes seeeeeeeds, precious seeds! The grocery store is stocking winter squash varieties you’ve never seen before. That nice Mennonite family down the road has some crazy birdhouse gourds in a shape you haven’t seen before.  There is amazing Indian corn for sale on the roadside.  And you’re all over it.

My personal favorite finds are the pumpkin and winter squash, and this is most definitely the season.

The other day I screeched to a halt in our car after passing a roadside stand sporting the craziest pumpkin I’d ever seen for sale. After realizing we weren’t all going to die in a fiery crash, my wife grinned at me and said, “pumpkin?” I nodded and ran before someone else could snag it.

She’s used to this seed-saving madness. I’ve been doing it for so long that if I ever stopped, she’d know I was taken over by an alien space pod.

But I digress.

Since Halloween is almost here and a lot of us will be cutting open pumpkins, let’s cover how to save pumpkin seeds. If you’d like to grow next year’s jack-o’-lanterns yourself or if you’re the type that can’t help but bring home beautiful new varieties from the local farmer’s market, today’s post is for you.

(Click here to read the rest at The Grow Network)

How Long Does a Pawpaw Tree Take to Produce Fruit from Seed?

how-long-does-it-take-pawpaw-to-fruit-from-seed

Maria has questions about how long it takes a pawpaw tree to produce fruit from seed (note that she is asking about Asimina triloba, not the tropical “pawpaw” Carica papaya):

“I read with interest how to grow pawpaw from seeds. Nowhere is mentioned how long does it take to produce fruit. I live in southern Ontario and don’t know any place with pawpaw fruit, we never eat it either. Local nursery is selling a plant about 3 ft tall ($40), must be 2 to 3 years old. They told me it will take another 6 to 10 years to produce fruit. We may not be around in 10 years therefore I was reluctant to buy the plant. The plant is common pawpaw and they suggested to get another variety from somewhere else as 2 trees are need it. It’s disappointing that knowledge of such a big nursery is so limited to a fruit tree common to southern Ontario. Should I buy the plant and when it blooms (how many years?) try to cross pollinate as suggested in your article. Can I pollinate from bloom to bloom or I need another tree?”

Great questions, Maria.

So How Long Does it Take for a Seedling PawPaw Tree to Bear Fruit?

According to a presentation by Patrick Byers at the University of Missouri:

“Seedling trees take longer to come into production (5 – 7 years) than grafted trees (3 – 4 years).”
I have read in multiple locations that a seedling pawpaw will bear fruit in 4 – 8 years, which lines up pretty closely with Byers’ 5 – 7 years. 10 years would be quite long.
Grafted trees already think they’re a mature specimen, so if you want to take some of the time off your wait for fruit, plus take the guesswork out of what kind of fruit the tree will bear – buy a grafted tree. I enjoy growing pawpaws from seed, as I share in my popular how-to post here, but if you have a source for improved pawpaw tree varieties, go for it.

Getting Your PawPaw to Fruit Faster

As pawpaw trees usually start to bear fruit at around 6′ in height, if you want a pawpaw to fruit faster, take better care of it. This goes for most fruit trees. Regular water, feeding, mulching – these are what get them established and growing.
For pollination, you should really have two pawpaw trees. It’s even better to plant three as it gives you a little redundancy in case you lose one. Some pawpaw trees can pollinate themselves from pollen from one flower to the next on the same tree; however, you cannot count on this tendency.
You can hand-pollinate pawpaw trees. I have not done it myself as the local insects did a fine job for me. The California Rare Fruit Growers have a very good guide to growing pawpaws and in it they cover pollination:

“Poor pollination has always plagued the pawpaw in nature, and the problem has followed them into domestication. Pawpaw flowers are perfect, in that they have both male and female reproduction parts, but they are not self-pollinating. The flowers are also protogynaus, i.e., the female stigma matures and is no longer receptive when the male pollen is shed. In addition pawpaws are self-incompatible, requiring cross pollination from another unrelated pawpaw tree.Bees show no interest in pawpaw flowers. The task of pollenization is left to unenthusiastic species of flies and beetles. A better solution for the home gardener is to hand pollinate, using a small, soft artist’s brush to transfer pollen to the stigma. Pollen is ripe for gathering when the ball of anthers is brownish in color, loose and friable. Pollen grains should appear as small beige-colored particles on the brush hairs. The stigma is receptive when the tips of the pistils are green, glossy and sticky, and the anther ball is firm and greenish to light yellow in color.”

I had a Florida pawpaw variety (Asimina parviflora) bloom and set fruit at the young age of three, but that isn’t all that common for the common pawpaw.

If you want to “create your own luck,” get a few grafted trees, take great care of them and throw in a few more seedling trees at the same time. The trees don’t take up a lot of space and can fit in around larger trees such as oak and hickory due to their shade tolerance.
Good luck – may you get much fruit!
*Original image at top by Wendell Smith. Creative Commons license.

Two Seeds and Lots of Promise

seeds-planted

I apologize for the late post today. I had a paperwork issue that needed clearing up this morning, which led to me visiting a hardware store and getting some PVC for a sound isolation booth I’m building, which led to giving one of my farmer neighbors and a pile of produce a ride home after his car died at the end of my road.

Though I was irritated at having to deal with paperwork this morning, it ended up well. Because I helped out my farmer friend, he invited me to have a drink with him at his house. As we were sitting there, he asked if I knew what a couple packages of seeds were – and handed me two little envelopes of seeds he’d been sent. One read “pitanga,” the other, “jaboticaba.”

I’ve been looking for both of these species since moving here. I showed him what they were on my smart phone and told him to plant them fast as they may not keep long in this hot and humid climate. He said he would, then gave me one of each.

Which I brought home with much thanks and planted directly:

I hope at least one of them grow. Both are highly productive and useful small fruits.

Delayed Sprouting on Seminole Pumpkins?

david-the-good-pumpkin-vines

A couple of days ago I posted a tour of some of the pumpkins we have growing:

Lots of good things happening.

A strange thing I didn’t mention in the video, though: I’ve planted quite a few fresh Seminole pumpkin seeds and they’ve failed to germinate. Older seeds from local pumpkins germinate – but fresh seeds, right from the Seminole pumpkin, no. Or at a very poor rate.

Another strange thing: I had a Seminole pumpkin vine come up multiple months after I planted it in my garden. Seriously – I had gone on and planted other things, then in the spot where I had planted a few earlier in the year, up came a Seminole pumpkin. I think it germinated due to the rainy season. Very strange, though. I have ten hills I planted and only a couple of Seminole pumpkins have emerged.

Does anyone know anything about delayed germinating in pumpkin seeds? Perhaps a germination-inhibiting enzyme?

Have a wonderful Sunday. See you tomorrow.

 

*            *            *

The earth is the Lord’s, and all its fullness,
The world and those who dwell therein.
For He has founded it upon the seas,
And established it upon the waters.

Who may ascend into the hill of the Lord?
Or who may stand in His holy place?
He who has clean hands and a pure heart,
Who has not lifted up his soul to an idol,
Nor sworn deceitfully.
He shall receive blessing from the Lord,
And righteousness from the God of his salvation.
This is Jacob, the generation of those who seek Him,
Who seek Your face. Selah

Lift up your heads, O you gates!
And be lifted up, you everlasting doors!
And the King of glory shall come in.
Who is this King of glory?
The Lord strong and mighty,
The Lord mighty in battle.
Lift up your heads, O you gates!
Lift up, you everlasting doors!
And the King of glory shall come in.
Who is this King of glory?
The Lord of hosts,
He is the King of glory. Selah

-Psalm 24, NKJV

Sprouting Moringa Seeds (No Luck? Maybe You Missed a Step!)

sprouting moringa seeds

Retired Senior Chief asks “can you lend any advice on sprouting moringa seeds? I have about a 3% germination rate right now and very frustrated.”

My answer:

Yes!

Sprouting moringa seeds is really easy – you just need to know a few things first.

Fresh seeds are needed

Moringa seeds lose viability rapidly in storage.

Make sure you get fresh ones.

Also, it’s probably a good idea to wait until the pods brown on the tree before picking them. A pod picked green may not have finished maturing the seeds – let nature work, then harvest when mature.

Sprouting Moringa Seeds Like Warm Temperatures

Moringa seeds like it warm to hot. Sprouting moringa seeds in a cool winter or spring is a losing proposition. I found this out when I ran my plant nursery. I wanted to get a bunch of seedlings started early so I’d be ready for the early summer plant shows, so in February put a bunch of pots out in the nursery and planted them all with good moringa seed.

Nothing happened for a couple of months. Then, a few seedlings emerged. Most of the seed failed.

This made me get smart.

The next time I planted moringa, I started them in pots on top of a heat mat (like this one).

Even in February, they came up fine and grew well. 80 degree weather is good for germination… 60s and low 70s, not so much.

Watch the Water

Too much water can kill young moringa seeds and trees. Don’t soak them. Plant your seeds, water them well, then water them again when the soil almost dries out.

Sprouting seeds and young seedlings have a high tendency to rot. Overwatering seedlings will often kill them. The trees can take a lot of water once they get taller, but when the wood is still green – watch out.

Moringa seeds take a week or two to sprout. I believe sprouting moringa seeds right in a good-sized pot or in the ground will give you stronger trees than starting them in little trays, as the roots are quite vigorous and like to move downwards.

You’ll find more on moringa in my book Totally Crazy Easy Florida Gardening: The Secret to Growing Piles of Food in the Sunshine State.

Good luck and happy gardening!

Gardening in Shells and Mango Propagation

South_FL_Food_Forest_Mango

I’ve got two questions from a reader I’ll answer today today: gardening in shells and mango propagation. Let’s jump in!

Deniz writes:

Hope you and your family feel much better since the car accident. It has finally rained today after weeks of drought, I hope it rains in the tropics soon too. I had questions about starting my own mango trees. What do you things is the easiest method to start from seed and can mangoes also be grown from cuttings? I am also planning on making a food forest with mango as the main large tree, the only problem is that that soil was infilled with shells to about a depth of two feet, what would be a easier method to grow trees in this substrate then digging it all up and replacing? The sediment that it produces is white and does not retain water and contain any organic matter. In the summer weeds grow all of the garden except for this area, and this area is the only area large enough to make a food forest as I have a small yard.”

Let’s attack mango propagation first:

Mango Propagation

Growing Mangoes from Seed

Mangoes are very easy to grow from seed.

Take seeds right from fresh fruit and don’t allow them to dry out. Plant them an inch or two deep in potting soil or compost and keep them watered. It usually takes about a month from them to germinate. Years ago when I started my first mango from seed, I read that if the pit sends up multiple sprouts, it will produce “true to type.” If it sends up a single shoot, it’s a wildcard.

Some sites recommend cutting open the husk of a mango seed and just planting the embryo. This may increase your germination rates but I haven’t found it necessary. If you do open it up, you can see whether it’s polyembryonic or monoembyronic, i.e. a multiple or single-shoot type. The polyembryonic seeds have multiple sections inside them.

If it’s a single-shoot seedling you get, don’t worry. It will likely give you fruit, but if you want a specific type of fruit, you’ll have to graft to make sure you get that.

Fortunately, mangoes are very easy to graft. My grafting video demonstrates multiple easy methods, and there are more online.

This page has a lot on mango propagation, plus grafting.

Growing Mangoes from Cuttings

Mangoes are not normally grown from cuttings.

Seedlings or grafting would be my recommendation, though from rumors on the ‘net some people have apparently rooted them from cuttings.

I tried air-layering my Grandpa’s mango tree without luck and eventually gave up. That’s a more forgiving method than cuttings and if it didn’t work, well, I just don’t want to bother. Seeds it is!

Gardening on Shells

The shell fill sounds like the problem with many gardens in the Florida Keys. High pH, no water retention, almost zero organic matter.

According to UF:

“On our type of lime rock fill soils, with high pH, minor elements will become insoluble in water. This is of concern since unless something is dissolved in water, it cannot be absorbed by plant roots, even though it may be present in the soil in high levels. With the addition of organic matter such as composted plant materials, mulch or leaf litter, the soil pH can be lowered. Over time, the area with added organic matter can be fertilized with minor elements. The elements will stay soluble and plants will produce healthy vigorous growth and happiness for you.”

I’m a member of Steve Solomon’s Soils and Health Group on Yahoo so I sent your question on gardening in shells by them for more insight.

Russel Lopez wrote back:

“I’m not familiar with mango trees, but I don’t think I would go to all the trouble of digging out substrate, unless you have access to heavy equipment and lots of good fill to replace it with. You would essentially be making a pot in the ground.”

He then linked to this article, which notes:

“Early studies of tree roots from the 1930s, often working in easy-to-dig loess soils, presented an image of trees with deep roots and root architecture that mimicked the structure of the top of the tree. The idea of a deeply-rooted tree became embedded as the typical root system for all trees. Later work on urban trees that were planted in more compacted soils more often found very shallow, horizontal root systems. Urban foresters have successfully spent a lot of energy trying to make people understand that tree roots have a basically horizontal orientation, to the point that even many tree professionals now believe that deep roots in trees are a myth. The truth lies somewhere in between deep roots and shallow roots.”

I have read that gardeners in the Keys will hack holes right into the compacted lime rock and shell mix, fill with some soil, then plant. The trees survive and thrive.
I would make a hole a few times the size of the root ball, put in some local earth, then plant. Mulch, keep it watered, and see what happens. Trees are very resilient. If you don’t have rock beneath, the roots should find what they need. Watch for pH issues, though. If the leaves yellow, I recommend adding some sulfur as well.
You can also foliar feed with compost tea and/or a balanced fertilizer containing micronutrients. Steve Solomon recommended Dyna-Gro to me but I haven’t had the chance to try it yet.
Good luck and send me updates! I would love to hear how your mangoes grow.

Free Nitrogen-Fixer Seeds

Nitrogen-fixers

I’m not picky when it comes to sources of soil fertility.

Sure, I could go the classic route and plant soybeans or peanuts, like farmers do, or I could go the grocery store and buy dry beans, peas and lentils, or…

…I could just go wander through the woods or even along the shoreline and pick up seeds from obvious nitrogen-fixing species.

Many, though not all, members of the bean and pea family, more properly known as Fabaceae, enjoy a special relationship with certain soil microbes which allows them to take nitrogen from the atmosphere – which is inaccessible to plants – and “fix” it into a form which plants can use.

Soybean-root-nodules

The roots of the plant share sugars and water with the bacteria, and in return, the bacteria give the plant nitrogen. It’s a fantastic design and one the gardener can put to work in his garden.

Once you learn to spot members of the bean and pea family, it because easy to find them.

If you don’t feel like you’re very good at plant ID, the book Botany in a Day has a lot of photos which will get you spotting plant families in no time.

Botany in a day

Though you’re not really going to learn botany in a single day – unless you’re some kind of a savant – Elpel does a nice job visually putting together plants into families and getting you going. You might not nail down a species right away, but you will be able to tell pretty certainly that the plant is in the hibiscus family or the soapberry family or, as concerns today’s post, the bean and pea family.

Nitrogen-fixing trees and plants are everywhere. In the case of the bay beans and Crotalaria I picked up at the beach, I know both of them fix nitrogen – and even if I didn’t know for sure, I could make a very good guess since they look like beans and are also nice and green in an area where they don’t have much right to look so chipper!

I’ll be planting these in rough areas and then later cutting them for use as compost while leaving the root systems in the ground. If you leave the roots instead of pulling them, you get more biomass in the soil and as the roots decay they’ll feed the next thing you plant.

Crotalaria isn’t edible (so far as I know) and the edibility of bay bean is disputable.

This woman, however, cooked and ate some – plus she made a nice privacy screen by planting a bamboo trellis with bay beans – but eat at your own risk. I’ll wait until I have more data.

Edibility is a nice plus with nitrogen-fixers but isn’t necessary. I’m mostly interested in feeding the ground for now.

If you’d like to see some of the many nitrogen-fixers I added to my old food forest in North Florida, check out this post.

Have a great Saturday – get out there and garden!

Updates on Grape Pruning, Coconut Seedlings, Jackfruit and Pigeon Peas

grape-pruned

I have had multiple requests for updates on my grape pruning and on my seedling tree plantings. This morning I posted a video sharing how things are going.

The pigeon peas and corn have come up, though the corn germination is patchy. One of the coconut trees gave up the ghost, so I planted a new tree to replace it.

In a few minutes I’m going down the hill to pick some more pigeon peas and I’ll take the camera with me. It’s rained a lot the last few days and I’m sure there’s plenty down there I need to harvest.

Pigeon peas really are remarkable. I’ve seen them thriving in rough ground scattered with chunks of concrete, along roadsides, in patches of weeds and in areas with little water. Add to that the plant’s ability to fix nitrogen, fuel rocket stoves and put protein on the table and you have a great crop.

If you missed it, check out my recent survival plant profile on pigeon peas here.

The jackfruit seedling is looking good:

jackfruit-seedling

That is the remaining tree after I thinned the seedlings out. You can see me plant this jackfruit in this video:

That makes this seedling about 8 months old. We need to get it growing faster.

…and there’s another video I could film!

I’ll get right on it.

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