Propagate Yams the Easy Way with Yam Minisetts

yam-minisetts-ready-for-planting

Grab yourself a big root, a knife and some ashes… it’s time to propagate yams!

Also see the CARDICaribbean video on propagating yams here:

Though I pick on the method in my video because I’m not a fan of soaking yams in pesticides or herbicides, it’s a fine presentation with good information otherwise.

Propagating Yams in Three Steps

how-to-propagate-yams-image

This is the minisett method of yam propagation. If you have bulbils, you can just use those; however, some yam species don’t make bulbils or you may be starting with a store-bought yam and don’t want to plant the whole thing. A good-sized yam can get you a dozen or more plants if you divide it well.

Step 1: Divide the Yam

To propagate yams from minisetts, get a fresh yam and cut it into pieces while ensuring you have a good piece of skin on each one from which the new growth will emerge.

making yam minisetts for yam propagation

You can cut the yam pieces even smaller than I cut them in the video. Half that size will still work. Larger pieces will give you stronger vines, however, so there’s a balance between getting more plants and getting more vigorous plants.

Step 2: Dip the Pieces in Ashes

Dip the cut pieces of yam in ashes and let them dry a bit.

dipping yam minisetts in ashes for propagating yams

Ashes seem to help heal the wound and protect it from infection. It’s a traditional method practiced in places where yams are grown. Pieces will also grow without ashes, but it’s an easy step so I follow it.

Step 3: Plant Your Yams

It’s important to plant yams in loose soil as they are a root crop.

In Florida sand I just dug a little hold and buried them and they’d get nice and big; however, in clay it’s important to loosen lots of space to give the roots a place to grow.

yam-bed

If you like, you can plant your yam minisetts in a big pot or a bed to ensure you only get ones that will sprout. When the vines start popping out from the ground, transfer your yams to where you would like them to grow – and don’t wait long – the vines will grow fast and become a big tangle if you don’t act quickly.

Ensure each yam has a solid stick they can climb. Shoot for 6-7′ tall poles or ever larger.

This is how I cut stakes:

Alternately, yams can be grown on fences or on trees.

More On Yam Propagation

Yam bulbils will also work for planting if you have access to them; however, not all Dioscorea species will make bulbils.

Note: I have successfully propagated Dioscorea alata from cuttings, but I don’t think that method will give you good yields, at least in the first year. If you can’t get roots or bulbils, go for it, though.

Usually it’s just easier to propagate yams by cutting big roots up into minisetts. Try your local ethnic market for yams and other treasures.

With the potato yam, just use entire roots from the cluster without cutting them into pieces, as that is supposed to work better.

Potato-yam-dioscorea

Here are the buckets (and a bag) of cut-up yams we planted, plus the still-intact potato yams:

yam pieces ready to plant yam minisetts

Now it’s time to cut stakes!

Discover more on yams in my survival plant profile.

I also cover yams as a crop in my books Totally Crazy Easy Florida Gardening and Grow or Die: The Good Guide to Survival Gardening.

Some recent reviews of Grow or Die:

grow-or-die-reviews

Though tropical yams won’t work in colder climates, temperate gardeners will have luck with the Chinese yam, AKA Dioscorea batatas.

Have fun – yams are a wonderful staple crop with good flavor and beautiful vines.

Related posts:

David-the-good-books-revised

5 comments

  • Great timing…. I recently pulled out a yam that has been growing for 2 years or longer (my first). It has been sitting on my porch for a few days. I am ready to figure out how to eat it but I also want to make new ones before I start chewing on it.. and then now your video comes out to show me how to do it. (make new ones not chew).. super… thanks.
    Keith

  • David, do you have any experience with discorea opposita (Chinese Yam) are there any different probigation issues? I found a source of rizhomes on Ebay and figured I might try it. I cannot find a source for the bulbifera or alotta varieties yet. Hoping you Rachel and the kids are doing well. Cheers! Fred and Anna in England.

    • Yes, I grew it. Look up “yamberries” on this site and on my YouTube channel.

      The little bulbils don’t always grow, but they will often take. I put them in somewhat moist soil and put them on a windowsill or a greenhouse rack and watered now and again until they came up. If you get a little handful of them, you’re sure to get multiple starts. They’re easy to grow and will take the cold, too.

  • Awesome. Thank you for the advice, I will let you know how it goes. Just got Coccinia Grandis seeds today, I am psyched. 🙂

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